Low serum cholesterol and peripheral nerve damage in patients with type 2 diabetes

Takeaway

  • Low serum cholesterol levels are associated with peripheral nerve damage in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN).

Why this matters

  • Nerve lesions in patients with T2D increase with lower serum cholesterol levels, suggesting that lowering serum cholesterol levels (a well-established treatment for dyslipidemia) may be associated with DPN.

  • This study may be the first to visualize in vivo that low levels of serum cholesterol are indeed associated with peripheral nerve swelling and a higher load of lipid equivalent lesions (LEL) in patients with T2D and DPN.

  • Clinical trials including patients with very low serum cholesterol levels should therefore monitor the onset or deterioration of neuropathic symptoms.